ENG 100E- Expanded Composition & ENG 101- Composition I

ENG 100E: EXPANDED COMPOSITION I

COURSE DESCRIPTION and THEME

Comp I-Expanded is a one-semester course designed to help build a real writing community and to work together to develop academic writing and reading strategies that will be crucial for a successful transition to ENG 101. Together, English 100E and ENG 101 will introduce you to some of the strategies, tools, and resources necessary to becoming successful communicators in a range of academic, professional, and public settings. This year, we will be looking at lots of pop culture issues, mainly focusing on films and television series and how those stories reflect and interact with real-life issues. Film is important because it engages with society, and society affects us all. We connect to our favorite characters for a reason. Twitter and social media follow actors and film news for a reason. Together, we’ll look at examples of these interactions and make our own connections and conclusions as to what they’re saying and why we think that matters.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

ENG 100E is a required course for those scoring 19 and below on the ACT. ENG 100E prepares students for a successful transition to ENG 101 and builds skills to meet the following GEC learning outcomes:1.the student is able to develop a topic and present ideas through writing in an organized, logical, and coherent form and in a style that is appropriate for the discipline and the situation.2.the student can observe conventions of Standard English grammar, punctuation, spelling, and usage. 3.the student can write a coherent analytical essay [considering the] rhetorical situation or through written communication effectively analyze the components of an argument.4.the student can find, use, and cite relevant information.In order to assist students in meeting these GEC learning outcomes, the Composition Program at Southern Miss has identified specific learning outcomes for each of its first-year writing courses that are meant to complement the GEC outcomes. At the completion of ENG 100E and 101, students will be able to:

  • Practice the rhetorical reading, thinking, and responding strategies necessary to cultivate strong inquiry, summary, analysis, and synthesis skills.
  • Develop, practice, and reflect on individual writing processes with a variety of genres and in response to a number of rhetorical situations.
  • Assess one’s own writing and the writing of others within specific rhetorical contexts and effectively give and act on feedback through flexible revision strategies.
  • Understand and effectively use a variety of academic and public genres and forms
  • Illustrate focus, development, source engagement, and language use appropriate to varied contexts and audiences.
  • Adapt composing and reading processes for a variety of technologies and modalities.

PROJECTS

Project One: Literacy Narrative (20%) A brief paper of 700-750 words (3-4 pages) in which you will analyze,reflect, and explore the circumstances and effects of a particular literacy moment in your life, with attention to the importance or significance of that moment. Literacy here does not just apply to reading or writing. You could write about an experience you had watching a film or a TV series, how you connected to a specific story or character. You could write about an experience you had with a music album or artist, or with a concert or a play/recital (that you either attended or performed in).

Project Two: Common Read Experience (20%) A collection of writing projects and creative activities that require you to summarize, analyze, engage with, and respond to our common read, Born a Crime by Trevor Noah. Together, we will read and engage with the book in a variety of ways to build academic reading and writing skills and to build a community of learners and readers. To receive full credit for the common read experience, you will be expected to read the book provided for you, to actively engage in classroom discussion, and to complete all assigned project forums in formal writing. Project Forums are due by class time on the day they’re assigned.

Project Three: Visual Rhetorical Analysis (20%) An essay of 750-1000 words (4-6 pages) in which you examine and closely analyze a visual text—be it an advertisement/meme/poster/photograph/YouTube video, etc—for what that image and its accompanying text reveal about the cultural values of the creator, intended audience, design and rhetorical choices, and how it might influence that audience’s actions and beliefs.

Final Portfolio (20%) The portfolio documents and illustrates your progress in the course, telling a story about your writing processes and growth this semester. The portfolio will include 1. A strategic revision to expand one of your Common Read Forums into a thesis-driven essay of 4-6 pages; 2. At least three additional pieces of writing that you produced in the class this semester, strategically chosen to tell a story about your growth and progress this semester; 3. A reflection essay in which you reflect on and explain these documents and how you have met the learning outcomes for this course.

Class Participation and Informal Writing (20%) Your contributions to class discussions; your participation in collaborative assignments; participation in peer review workshops; bringing all materials to class; supporting your learning community; and completion of assigned readings.Spread out over the semester, your homework assignments and discussion board/reading journal entries will help you and the class consider our readings in more depth. Your entries (200-400 words) should respond to our course readings by analyzing, comparing, and contrasting how various authors understand and respond to some aspect of our class discussions. You will be required to write entries for almost every class. (Remember that the Common Read Forum is a separate assignment and will use different criteria from discussion board posts and will, therefore, have different requirements. We will discuss specific criteria and requirements for those assignments.)You are also expected to bring all printed drafts to class on the day that they are due.

ENG 101: COMPOSITION I

COURSE DESCRIPTION and THEME

English 101 introduces students to some of the strategies, tools, and resources necessary to becoming successful communicators in a range of academic, professional, and public settings. English 101 students learn not only to think carefully through writing, but also to reflect critically about writing by engaging a variety of discursive forms, from the academic essay to opinion pieces, from essays to advertisements. This semester, we will be looking at superhero culture and identity, and how those stories reflect and interact with real-life issues. From Marvel to DC, superhero films inundate our culture, and their narratives impact our lives. Why are we so drawn to these characters? What is it about their stories that attracts us? Why does representation matter? How do they influence both individual and corporate notions of identity in America? Do they perhaps influence us too much? Together, we’ll look at examples of these interactions and make our own connections and conclusions as to what they’re saying and why we think that matters.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

ENG 101 is a GEC-required course at USM, and students taking this course are expected to meet the following GEC learning outcomes:

  • The student is able to develop a topic and present ideas through writing in an organized, logical, and coherent form and in a style that is appropriate for the discipline and the situation.
  • The student can observe conventions of Standard English grammar, punctuation, spelling, and usage.
  • The student can write a coherent analytical essay [considering the] rhetorical situation or through written communication effectively analyze the components of an argument.
  • The student can find, use, and cite relevant information.

In order to assist students in meeting these GEC learning outcomes, the Composition Program at Southern Miss has identified specific learning outcomes for each of its first-year writing courses that are meant to complement the GEC outcomes. At the completion of ENG 101, students will be able to:

  • Practice the rhetorical reading, thinking, and responding strategies necessary to cultivate strong inquiry, summary, analysis, and synthesis skills.
  • Develop, practice, and reflect on individual writing processes with a variety of genres and in response to a number of rhetorical situations.
  • Assess one’s own writing and the writing of others within specific rhetorical contexts and effectively give and act on feedback through flexible revision strategies.
  • Understand and effectively use a variety of academic and public genres and forms
  • Illustrate focus, development, source engagement, and language use appropriate to varied contexts and audiences.
  • Adapt composing and reading processes for a variety of technologies and modalities.

PROJECTS

Project One: Rhetorical Analysis (20%) An essay of 700-750 words (3-4 pages)in which you will examine the ways one of our course readings is organized and works in relation to its audience and context.This shows that you can analyze an author’s opinion, their reason for writing, their intended audience, and the ways they are attempting to reach that audience. You must choose from one of the articles in the Project One Readings module.

Project Two: A Position Paper (20%) An argument essay of 700-750 words (3-4 pages) in which you illustrate your ability to summarize, analyze, and synthesize course readings, while supporting your own original argument. You must choose from the articles in the Project Two Readings module, and you must cite evidence from at least two articles to help support your position. This shows that you can incorporate other voices and opinions with your own—even if you are taking a different stance.

Project Three: A Creative Redux (20%) An opportunity to revise one of your primary assignments for a new audience in a completely new medium.This creative medium can include found journals, collages, poems, short stories, etc.In addition to the “redux,” you will write a cover letter explaining your rhetorical choices.

Final Portfolio (20%) A final portfolio in which you include one strategically (and thoroughly) revised essay and a reflective essay, which will ask you to critically reflect on and discuss nearly every aspect of your work for this course.You must also include at least two other writing assignments such as reading logs or homework assignments that demonstrate your ability to meet the course requirements.

Class Participation and Informal Writing (20%) Your contributions to class discussions; your participation in collaborative assignments; participation in peer review workshops; bringing all materials to class; supporting your learning community; and completion of assigned readings. Spread out over the semester, your homework assignments and reading log entries will help you and the class consider our readings in more depth. Your entries (200-400 words) should respond to our course readings by analyzing, comparing, and contrasting how various authors understand and respond to some aspect of our class discussions by incorporating at least one line of direct quotation from the reading itself to support your topic. You are also expected to bring all printed drafts to class on the day that they are due.